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dc.contributor.authorPuusa, Anu
dc.contributor.authorHokkila, Kirsi
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-20T10:58:29Z
dc.date.available2016-07-20T10:58:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-08
dc.identifier.citationPuusa, Anu & Hokkila, Kirsi. Self-employment in a worker co-operative: Finding a balance between individual and community needs.fi_FI
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/120
dc.descriptionArticle
dc.description.abstractThis research explores self-employment in a worker co-operative context. The empirical case study was conducted using qualitative methods, with a focus on interpreting the motivations for choosing a co-operative as a business form for self-employment. We examine the relationship between co-operative practice and theory with regards to its established principles and dual nature in a framework of entrepreneurship literature. This article answers the following question: How are the characteristics of a co-operative business form interpreted and do they reflect the traditional, well-established core ideas of co-operatives? Based on the analysis, we identified 6 motivational factors that describe a co-operative as a business form in the context of self-employment. Three of these reflect the universal autonomy needs identified in self-employment literature: empowerment, self-management and freedom. We propose that the other three, security, diversity and communality, are unique features of co-operatives that stem from the established co-operative principles. In addition to the basic autonomy needs of self-employment, we conclude that co-operative structure offers various additional benefits for the self-employed. The latter features make a co-operative community a distinctive and unique forum for self-employment and serve as the essential drivers for choosing this particular business form. However, we found that, once combined with the autonomy features, they might result in problems finding a balance between individual and community needs. We therefore claim that, although co-operatives have an ability to lower the barrier to entrepreneurship, the needs of self-employed people are not unquestionably compatible with the features or needs of a co-operative company. Based on our research, we suggest that individuality and communality are the rival forces that form the most inherent contradiction in worker co-operative operations. Therefore, we propose that the striving for balance between individual needs and those of the community reflects a 'new dual role' of co-operatives.fi_FI
dc.language.isoenfi_FI
dc.publisherThe Committee on Co-operative Research (CCR)fi_FI
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCo-operatives and the World of Work, 2015 International Research Conference, Antalya, Turkey, 8-10 November 2015;
dc.relation.urihttp://ccr.ica.coop/en/co-operatives-and-world-work-ccrilo-2015-international-research-conference-antalya-turkey
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.subjectCo-operativefi_FI
dc.subjectWorker co-operativefi_FI
dc.subjectSelf-employmentfi_FI
dc.subjectDual naturefi_FI
dc.subjectCo-operative principlesfi_FI
dc.titleSelf-employment in a worker co-operative: Finding a balance between individual and community needsfi_FI
dc.typehttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.versionPublisher's pdf
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies
uef.solecris.id36164806
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/NonPeerReviewed
dc.type.publicationinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.rights.accessrights© International Co-operative Alliance
dc.description.reviewstatushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/NonPeerReviewed


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