Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRosati, Bernadette
dc.contributor.authorChristiansen, Sigurd
dc.contributor.authorWollesen de Jonge, Robin
dc.contributor.authorRoldin, Pontus
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Mads Mørk
dc.contributor.authorWang, Kai
dc.contributor.authorMoosakutty, Shamjad P.
dc.contributor.authorThomsen, Ditte
dc.contributor.authorSalomonsen, Camilla
dc.contributor.authorHyttinen, Noora
dc.contributor.authorElm, Jonas
dc.contributor.authorFeilberg, Anders
dc.contributor.authorGlasius, Marianne
dc.contributor.authorBilde, Merete
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T07:52:20Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T07:52:20Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/25491
dc.description.abstractDimethyl sulfide (DMS) is produced by plankton in oceans and constitutes the largest natural emission of sulfur to the atmosphere. In this work, we examine new particle formation from the primary pathway of oxidation of gas-phase DMS by OH radicals. We particularly focus on particle growth and mass yield as studied experimentally under dry conditions using the atmospheric simulation chamber AURA. Experimentally, we show that aerosol mass yields from oxidation of 50–200 ppb of DMS are low (2–7%) and that particle growth rates (8.2–24.4 nm/h) are comparable with ambient observations. An HR-ToF-AMS was calibrated using methanesulfonic acid (MSA) to account for fragments distributed across both the organic and sulfate fragmentation table. AMS-derived chemical compositions revealed that MSA was always more dominant than sulfate in the secondary aerosols formed. Modeling using the Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM) indicates that the Master Chemical Mechanism gas-phase chemistry alone underestimates experimentally observed particle formation and that DMS multiphase and autoxidation chemistry is needed to explain observations. Based on quantum chemical calculations, we conclude that particle formation from DMS oxidation in the ambient atmosphere will most likely be driven by mixed sulfuric acid/MSA clusters clustering with both amines and ammonia.
dc.language.isoenglanti
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)
dc.relation.ispartofseriesACS earth and space chemistry
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsearthspacechem.0c00333
dc.rightsCC BY http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectatmospheric simulation chamber
dc.subjectdimethyl sulfide
dc.subjectmethanesulfonic acid
dc.subjectphoto-oxidation
dc.subjectnucleation
dc.subjectgrowth rate
dc.titleNew Particle Formation and Growth from Dimethyl Sulfide Oxidation by Hydroxyl Radicals
dc.description.versionpublished version
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Applied Physics, activities
uef.solecris.id78551360en
dc.type.publicationTieteelliset aikakauslehtiartikkelit
dc.rights.accessrights© 2021 The Authors
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020-EU.1.1./717022/EU/The unexplored world of aerosol surfaces and their impacts/SURFACE
dc.relation.doi10.1021/acsearthspacechem.0c00333
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange801-811
dc.relation.issue4
dc.relation.volume5
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess
dc.type.okmA1
uef.solecris.openaccessHybridijulkaisukanavassa ilmestynyt avoin julkaisu


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record