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dc.contributor.authorKoskinen, Jyri-Pekka
dc.contributor.authorKiviranta, Hannu
dc.contributor.authorVartiainen, Erkki
dc.contributor.authorJousilahti, Pekka
dc.contributor.authorVlasoff, Tiina
dc.contributor.authorvon Hertzen, Leena
dc.contributor.authorMäkelä, Mika
dc.contributor.authorLaatikainen, Tiina
dc.contributor.authorHaahtela, Tari
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-14T08:40:14Z
dc.date.available2017-02-14T08:40:14Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier10.1186/s13601-016-0103-1fi_FI
dc.identifier.issn2045-7022
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/257
dc.descriptionArticle
dc.description.abstractBackground Atopic allergy is much more common in Finnish compared with Russian Karelia, although these areas are geographically and genetically close. To explore the role of environmental chemicals on the atopy difference a random sample of 200 individuals, 25 atopic and 25 non-atopic school-aged children and their mothers, were studied. Atopy was defined as having at least one positive skin prick test response to 14 common inhalant and food allergens tested. Concentrations of 11 common environmental pollutants were measured in blood samples. Results Overall, the chemical levels were much higher in Russia than in Finland, except for 2,2′,4,4′-tetra-bromodiphenyl ether (BDE47). In Finland but not in Russia, the atopic children had higher concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls and 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (DDE) than the non-atopic children. In Russia but not in Finland, the atopic mothers had higher DDE concentrations than the non-atopic mothers. Conclusions Higher concentrations of common environmental chemicals were measured in Russian compared with Finnish Karelian children and mothers. The chemicals did not explain the higher prevalence of atopy on the Finnish side.fi_FI
dc.language.isoENGfi_FI
dc.publisherBioMed Centralfi_FI
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/261357///MEDALL
dc.relation.ispartofseriesClinical and Translational Allergy
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.1186/s13601-016-0103-1fi_FI
dc.rightsCC BY http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAllergyfi_FI
dc.subjectAtopyfi_FI
dc.subjectEnvironmental chemicalsfi_FI
dc.subjectFinnish Kareliafi_FI
dc.subjectRussian Kareliafi_FI
dc.titleCommon environmental chemicals do not explain atopy contrast in the Finnish and Russian Kareliafi_FI
dc.typehttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.versionpublisher's pdffi_FI
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine / Public Health
uef.solecris.id41738448
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewedfi_FI
dc.type.publicationinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.rights.accessrights© Authors
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/261357///MEDALL
dc.relation.doi10.1186/s13601-016-0103-1
dc.description.reviewstatushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed
dc.relation.articlenumber14
dc.relation.issn2045-7022
dc.relation.issue1
dc.relation.volume6
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess


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