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dc.contributor.authorPodlipská, J
dc.contributor.authorGuermazi, A
dc.contributor.authorLehenkari, P
dc.contributor.authorNiinimäki, J
dc.contributor.authorRoemer, FW
dc.contributor.authorArokoski, JP
dc.contributor.authorKaukinen, P
dc.contributor.authorLiukkonen, E
dc.contributor.authorLammentausta, E
dc.contributor.authorNieminen, MT
dc.contributor.authorTervonen, O
dc.contributor.authorKoski, JM
dc.contributor.authorSaarakkala, S
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-15T07:21:11Z
dc.date.available2017-02-15T07:21:11Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierhttp://doi.org/10.1038/srep22365fi_FI
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/276
dc.descriptionArticle
dc.description.abstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level.fi_FI
dc.language.isoENfi_FI
dc.publisherSpringer Naturefi_FI
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScientific Reports
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.1038/srep22365fi_FI
dc.rightsCC BY http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/fi_FI
dc.subjectCartilagefi_FI
dc.subjectDiagnosisfi_FI
dc.subjectMedical researchfi_FI
dc.subjectOsteoarthritisfi_FI
dc.titleComparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Studyfi_FI
dc.typehttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.versionpublisher's pdffi_FI
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine / Clinical Medicine
uef.solecris.id41570476
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewedfi_FI
dc.type.publicationinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.rights.accessrights© Authorsfi_FI
dc.relation.doi10.1038/srep22365
dc.description.reviewstatushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed
dc.relation.articlenumber22365
dc.relation.issn2045-2322
dc.relation.issue6


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