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dc.contributor.authorToivanen Anna-Leena
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T09:50:53Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T09:50:53Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/4235
dc.description.abstractDespite all the attention it has received, Afropolitanism remains undertheorised. Afropolitanism, inspired by the concept of cosmopolitanism, includes an explicit link to the African continent, which may result in promoting racialised and territorialised biases. It is also often conceived as an identity position, which tends to result, firstly, in unfruitful debates on who qualifies as ‘Afropolitan’ and, secondly, in generating critical interest in a mere handful of ‘Afropolitan’ star authors. This article argues that, instead of introducing a ‘new’ concept, it would be more useful to continue to revisit the concept of cosmopolitanism in order to explore its potentials in the analysis of African literatures.en
dc.language.isoENen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEuropean Journal of English Studiesen
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13825577.2017.1344475en
dc.rightsAll rights reserveden
dc.subjectAfrican literatureen
dc.subjectAfropolitanen
dc.subjectAfropolitanismen
dc.subjectcosmopolitanismen
dc.subjectcritical readingen
dc.subjectmobilityen
dc.titleCosmopolitanism's new clothes? The limits of the concept of Afropolitanismen
dc.description.versionfinal draften
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Humanities, shared activitiesen
uef.solecris.id49056749en
dc.type.publicationinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.rights.accessrights© Informa UK Limiteden
dc.relation.doi10.1080/13825577.2017.1344475en
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerRevieweden
dc.format.pagerange189-205en
dc.relation.issn1382-5577en
dc.relation.issue2en
dc.relation.volume21en
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessen
dc.type.okmA1en
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionen
uef.solecris.openaccessEi


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