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dc.contributor.authorKarttunen, Niina
dc.contributor.authorTaipale, Heidi
dc.contributor.authorHamina, Aleksi
dc.contributor.authorTanskanen, Antti
dc.contributor.authorTiihonen, Jari
dc.contributor.authorTolppanen, Anna-Maija
dc.contributor.authorHartikainen, Sirpa
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-11T09:08:39Z
dc.date.available2018-12-11T09:08:39Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/7190
dc.description.abstractObjective The study aims to determine the prevalence of concomitant use of benzodiazepines and opioids among community‐dwelling older people with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD). An additional aim was to describe the factors associated with prolonged concomitant use, and the most commonly used combinations of these drugs. Methods This study utilized data from the register‐based Medication Use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study, including all community‐dwelling residents of Finland who received a clinically verified AD diagnosis between 2005 and 2011 (n = 70 718) and their matched comparison persons without AD. After exclusion of individuals who were hospitalized throughout the follow‐up, 69 353 persons with and 69 353 without AD were included in this study. Results Benzodiazepines and related drugs (BZDRs) were used by 28 475 (41.1%) of those with and 24 506 (35.3%) of those without AD. Prolonged (greater than or equal to 90 days) concomitant use of BZDRs and opioids was more common among BZDR users without AD (N = 3936; 16.1%) than among those with AD (N = 2963; 10.4%). A shorter duration of concomitant use (1‐89 days) revealed similar results, N = 3821; 15.6% and N = 3008; 10.6%, respectively. Prolonged concomitant use of BZDRs and opioids was associated with female sex, low socioeconomic position, most of the common comorbidities and history of substance abuse or long‐term benzodiazepine use. The most commonly used combinations were Z‐drug (31.7%) or benzodiazepine (29.9%) with a weak opioid. Conclusions Despite the recommendations and risks, the prevalence of concomitant BZDR and opioid use was common in older persons with or without AD. It is important to develop strategies to reduce unnecessary concomitant use of these drugs.
dc.language.isoenglanti
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofseriesINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.5018
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.subjectbenzodiazepines
dc.subjectopioids
dc.subjectolder people
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease
dc.titleConcomitant use of benzodiazepines and opioids in community-dwelling older people with or without Alzheimer's disease - A nationwide register-based study in Finland
dc.description.versionfinal draft
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Pharmacy, Activities
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine / Clinical Medicine
uef.solecris.id58205807en
dc.type.publicationTieteelliset aikakauslehtiartikkelit
dc.rights.accessrights© John Wiley & Sons
dc.relation.doi10.1002/gps.5018
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn0885-6230
dc.relation.volume[Epub ahead of print 27 Nov 2018]
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess
dc.type.okmA1
uef.solecris.openaccessEi


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