Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFaiola, C. L.
dc.contributor.authorJobson, B. T.
dc.contributor.authorVanReken, T. M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T05:16:32Z
dc.date.available2016-06-14T05:16:32Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-28
dc.identifierdoi: 10.5194/bg-12-527-2015
dc.identifier.citationFaiola, C. L., Jobson, B. T., and VanReken, T. M.: Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants, Biogeosciences, 12, 527-547, doi:10.5194/bg-12-527-2015, 2015. Publications Copernicus Search articles Special issue Integrated Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere Processes Study (iLE... Download PDF XML Companion paper Short summary Environmental stresses can have large impacts on the emissions of volatile organic compounds from... Read more Citation BibTeX EndNote Share Mendeley CiteULike Reddit Delicious Twitterfi_FI
dc.identifier.issn1726-4189
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/71
dc.descriptionArticle
dc.description.abstractThe largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.fi_FI
dc.language.isoenfi_FI
dc.publisherCopernicus GmbHfi_FI
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBiogeosciences 12 (2);
dc.relation.urihttp://www.biogeosciences.net/12/527/2015/
dc.rightsLicenced under CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.titleImpacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plantsfi_FI
dc.typehttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.versionPublisher's pdf
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Science and Forestry
uef.solecris.id30676818
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed
dc.type.publicationinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.rights.accessrights© Author(s) 2015.
dc.relation.doidoi: 10.5194/bg-12-527-2015
dc.description.reviewstatushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn1726-4189
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record