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dc.contributor.authorBeynon, R
dc.contributor.authorRichmond, RC
dc.contributor.authorSantos Ferreira, DL
dc.contributor.authorNess, AR
dc.contributor.authorMay, M
dc.contributor.authorDavey Smith, G
dc.contributor.authorVincent, EE
dc.contributor.authorAdams, C
dc.contributor.authorAla-Korpela, M
dc.contributor.authorWürtz, P
dc.contributor.authorSoidinsalo, S
dc.contributor.authorMetcalfe, C
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, JL
dc.contributor.authorLane, AJ
dc.contributor.authorMartin, RM
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-19T07:02:42Z
dc.date.available2018-12-19T07:02:42Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/7219
dc.description.abstractLycopene and green tea consumption have been observationally associated with reduced prostate cancer risk, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of factorial randomisation to a 6‐month lycopene and green tea dietary advice or supplementation intervention on 159 serum metabolite measures in 128 men with raised PSA levels (but prostate cancer‐free), analysed by intention‐to‐treat. The causal effects of metabolites modified by the intervention on prostate cancer risk were then assessed by Mendelian randomisation, using summary statistics from 44,825 prostate cancer cases and 27,904 controls. The systemic effects of lycopene and green tea supplementation on serum metabolic profile were comparable to the effects of the respective dietary advice interventions (R2 = 0.65 and 0.76 for lycopene and green tea respectively). Metabolites which were altered in response to lycopene supplementation were acetate [β (standard deviation difference vs. placebo): 0.69; 95% CI = 0.24, 1.15; p = 0.003], valine (β: −0.62; −1.03, −0.02; p = 0.004), pyruvate (β: −0.56; −0.95, −0.16; p = 0.006) and docosahexaenoic acid (β: −0.50; −085, −0.14; p = 0.006). Valine and diacylglycerol were lower in the lycopene dietary advice group (β: −0.65; −1.04, −0.26; p = 0.001 and β: −0.59; −1.01, −0.18; p = 0.006). A genetically instrumented SD increase in pyruvate increased the odds of prostate cancer by 1.29 (1.03, 1.62; p = 0.027). An intervention to increase lycopene intake altered the serum metabolome of men at risk of prostate cancer. Lycopene lowered levels of pyruvate, which our Mendelian randomisation analysis suggests may be causally related to reduced prostate cancer risk.
dc.language.isoenglanti
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofseriesINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31929
dc.rightsCC BY http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectprostate cancer
dc.subjectdietary intervention
dc.subjectlycopene
dc.subjectgreen tea
dc.subjectMendelian randomisation
dc.titleInvestigating the effects of lycopene and green tea on the metabolome of men at risk of prostate cancer: The ProDiet randomised controlled tria
dc.description.versionpublished version
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Pharmacy, Activities
uef.solecris.id57877711en
dc.type.publicationTieteelliset aikakauslehtiartikkelit
dc.rights.accessrights© Authors
dc.relation.doi10.1002/ijc.31929
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.relation.issn0020-7136
dc.relation.volume[Epub ahead of print 7 Dec 2018]
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess
dc.type.okmA1
uef.solecris.openaccessHybridijulkaisukanavassa ilmestynyt avoin julkaisu


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