Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMartikainen, MV
dc.contributor.authorRönkkö, TJ
dc.contributor.authorSchaub, B
dc.contributor.authorTäubel, M
dc.contributor.authorGu, C
dc.contributor.authorWong, GW
dc.contributor.authorLi, J
dc.contributor.authorPekkanen, J
dc.contributor.authorKomppula, M
dc.contributor.authorHirvonen, MR
dc.contributor.authorJalava, PI
dc.contributor.authorRoponen, M
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-07T12:48:39Z
dc.date.available2019-02-07T12:48:39Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/7433
dc.description.abstractBackground Studies conducted in farm environments suggest that diverse microbial exposure promotes children's lung health. The underlying mechanisms are unclear, and the development of asthma‐preventive strategies has been delayed. More comprehensive investigation of the environment‐induced immunoregulation is required for better understanding of asthma pathogenesis and prevention. Exposure to air pollution, including particulate matter (PM), is a risk factor for asthma, thus providing an excellent counterpoint for the farm‐effect research. Lack of comparable data, however, complicates interpretation of the existing information. We aimed to explore the immunoregulatory effects of cattle farm dust (protective, Finland) and urban air PM (high‐risk, China) for the first time using identical research methods. Methods We stimulated PBMCs of 4‐year‐old children (N = 18) with farm dust and size‐segregated PM and assessed the expression of immune receptors CD80 and ILT4 on dendritic cells and monocytes as well as cytokine production of PBMCs. Environmental samples were analysed for their composition. Results Farm dust increased the percentage of cells expressing CD80 and the cytokine production of children's immune cells, whereas PM inhibited the expression of important receptors and the production of soluble mediators. Although PM samples induced parallel immune reactions, the size‐fraction determined the strength of the effects. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the significance of using the same research framework when disentangling shared and distinctive immune pathways operating in different environments. Observed stimulatory effects of farm dust and inhibitory effects of PM could shape responses towards respiratory pathogens and allergens, and partly explain differences in asthma prevalence between studied environments.
dc.language.isoenglanti
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.12975
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.subjectair pollution
dc.subjectasthma
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.subjectfarming
dc.subjectimmune cells
dc.titleIntegrating farm and air pollution studies in search for immunoregulatory mechanisms operating in protective and high-risk environments
dc.description.versionfinal draft
dc.contributor.departmentYmpäristö- ja biotieteiden laitos / Toiminta
uef.solecris.id56925725en
dc.type.publicationTieteelliset aikakauslehtiartikkelit
dc.rights.accessrights© EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S.
dc.relation.doi10.1111/pai.12975
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange815-822
dc.publisher.countryBritannia
dc.relation.issn0905-6157
dc.relation.issue8
dc.relation.volume29
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess
dc.type.okmA1
uef.solecris.openaccessEi


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record