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dc.contributor.authorSalonen, Anssi
dc.contributor.authorHartikainen-Ahia, Anu
dc.contributor.authorKeinonen, Tuula
dc.contributor.authorDireito, Ines
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, John
dc.contributor.authorScheersoi, Annette
dc.contributor.authorWeiser, Lara
dc.contributor.editorMcLoughlin, E; Finlayson, OE; Erduran, S; Childs, P
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-18T10:26:18Z
dc.date.available2019-10-18T10:26:18Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/7798
dc.description.abstractHigh achievers with low self-efficacy in science lack interest in choosing science studies and careers. Wide-ranging knowledge of specific working life skills in science-related careers can help students identify their own strengths in science. This improves their self-efficacy beliefs in science and further promotes interest in pursuing science studies and careers. The purpose of this paper is to examine lower secondary school students’ knowledge of specific working life skills. The participants in this study were 215 British, 144 Finnish and 154 German students, aged 12–14 years. Using open-ended questions and content analysis, we examined students’ perceptions of working life skills needed in science-related careers. The results reveal that the students have a great deal of knowledge about working life skills, but it is often stereotypical. Students frequently mentioned sector-specific knowledge and personal attributes, but skills related to career development, organization, time and society skills were often omitted. Some variation exists between the countries. The British students linked careers in science with a great deal of thinking skills, whereas the Finnish students emphasized sector-specific knowledge. The German students described the careers more with personal attributes than in the other two countries. We conclude that the students need learning experiences including presentation of working life skills such as interacting with professionals and their real work-life problems, open-ended inquiries and balanced team working. These experiences increase students’ awareness and perceived relevance of careers and working life skills, help identifying and promoting own strengths and self-efficacy and encourage choosing science-related careers.
dc.language.isoenglanti
dc.relation.ispartofBridging Research and Practice in Science Education
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17219-0_8
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.subjectworking life skills
dc.subjectself-efficacy
dc.subjectscience-related careers
dc.subjectlower secondary school
dc.subjectscience education
dc.titleStudents' Awareness of Working Life Skills in the UK, Finland and Germany
dc.description.versionfinal draft
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Applied Educational Science and Teacher Education / Joensuu
uef.solecris.id64834400en
dc.type.publicationArtikkelit tieteellisissä kokoomateoksissa
dc.rights.accessrights© Springer Nature
dc.relation.doi10.1007/978-3-030-17219-0_8
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerReviewed
dc.format.pagerange123-138
dc.relation.isbn978-3-030-17218-3
dc.relation.issn2213-3623
dc.relation.numberinseries6
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccess
dc.type.okmA3
uef.solecris.openaccessEi


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