Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPuurunen Jenni
dc.contributor.authorSulkama Sini
dc.contributor.authorTiira Katriina
dc.contributor.authorAraujo Cesar
dc.contributor.authorLehtonen Marko
dc.contributor.authorHanhineva Kati
dc.contributor.authorLohi Hannes
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-19T12:16:15Z
dc.date.available2017-01-19T12:16:15Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier10.1186/s12993-016-0112-1fi_FI
dc.identifier.issn1744-9081
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/193
dc.descriptionArticle
dc.description.abstractBackground Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent and multifactorial neuropsychiatric disorder in the human population worldwide. Complex etiology and clinical heterogeneity have challenged the research, diagnostics and treatment of the disease. Hyperactive and impulsive behaviour has also been observed in dogs, and they could offer a physiologically relevant model for human ADHD. As a part of our ongoing study to understand the molecular etiology of canine anxiety traits, this study was aimed to pilot an approach to identify metabolic biomarkers in canine ADHD-like behaviours for research, diagnostics and treatment purposes. Methods We collected fresh plasma samples from 22 German Shepherds with varying ADHD-like behaviours. All dogs were on the same controlled diet for 2 weeks prior to sampling. A liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based non-targeted metabolite profiling was performed to identify plasma metabolites correlating with the ADHD-like behaviour of the dogs. Results 649 molecular features correlated with ADHD-like behavioural scores (praw < 0.05), and three of them [sn-1 LysoPC(18:3), PC(18:3/18:2) and sn-1 LysoPE(18:2)] had significant correlations also after FDR correction (pFDR < 0.05). Phospholipids were found to negatively correlate with ADHD-like behavioural scores, whereas tryptophan metabolites 3-indolepropionic acid (IPA) and kynurenic acid (KYNA) had negative and positive correlations with ADHD-like behavioural scores, respectively. Conclusions Our study identified associations between canine ADHD-like behaviours and metabolites that are involved in lipid and tryptophan metabolisms. The identified metabolites share similarity with earlier findings in human and rodent ADHD models. However, a larger replication study is warranted to validate the discoveries prior to further studies to understand the biological role of the identified metabolites in canine ADHD-like behaviours.fi_FI
dc.language.isoENfi_FI
dc.publisherSpringer Naturefi_FI
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN FUNCTIONS
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12993-016-0112-1fi_FI
dc.rightsCC BY http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/fi_FI
dc.subjectDogfi_FI
dc.subjectADHDfi_FI
dc.subjectNon-targeted metabolite profilingfi_FI
dc.subjectMetabolomicsfi_FI
dc.titleA non-targeted metabolite profiling pilot study suggests that tryptophan and lipid metabolisms are linked with ADHD-like behaviours in dogsfi_FI
dc.typehttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
dc.description.versionpublisher's pdffi_FI
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Pharmacy, Activities
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine / Clinical Nutrition
uef.solecris.id42626714
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewedfi_FI
dc.type.publicationinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.rights.accessrights© Authorsfi_FI
dc.relation.doi10.1186/s12993-016-0112-1
dc.description.reviewstatushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed
dc.relation.articlenumber27
dc.relation.issn1744-9081
dc.relation.issue1
dc.relation.volume12


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record