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dc.contributor.authorSarin Jaakko Kalevi
dc.contributor.authorBrommer Harold
dc.contributor.authorArgüelles David
dc.contributor.authorPuhakka Pia Henriikka
dc.contributor.authorInkinen Satu Irene
dc.contributor.authorAfara Isaac Oluwaseun
dc.contributor.authorSaarakkala Simo
dc.contributor.authorTöyräs Juha
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-25T12:13:28Z
dc.date.available2017-08-25T12:13:28Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://erepo.uef.fi/handle/123456789/4244
dc.description.abstractObjective We investigate the potential of a prototype multimodality arthroscope, combining ultrasound, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and arthroscopic indentation device, for assessing cartilage lesions, and compare the reliability of this approach with conventional arthroscopic scoring ex vivo. Design Areas of interest (AIs, N = 43) were selected from equine fetlock joints (N = 5). Blind-coded AIs were independently scored by two equine surgeons employing International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scoring system via conventional arthroscope and multimodality arthroscope, in which high-frequency ultrasound and OCT catheters were attached to an arthroscopic indentation device. In addition, cartilage stiffness was measured with the indentation device, and lesions in OCT images scored using custom-made automated software. Measurements and scorings were performed twice in two separate rounds. Finally, the scores were compared to histological ICRS scores. Results OCT and arthroscopic examinations showed the highest average agreements (55.2%) between the scoring by surgeons and histology scores, whereas ultrasound had the lowest (50.6%). Average intraobserver agreements of surgeons and interobserver agreements between rounds were, respectively, for conventional arthroscope (68.6%, 69.8%), ultrasound (68.6%, 68.6%), OCT (65.1%, 61.7%) and automated software (65.1%, 59.3%). Conclusions OCT imaging supplemented with the automated software provided the most reliable lesion scoring. However, limited penetration depth of light limits the clinical potential of OCT in assessing human cartilage thickness; thus, the combination of OCT and ultrasound could be optimal for reliable diagnostics. Present findings suggest imaging and quantitatively analyzing the entire articular surface to eliminate surgeon-related variation in the selection of the most severe lesion to be scored.en
dc.language.isoENen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOSTEOARTHRITIS AND CARTILAGEen
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2016.12.007en
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectCartilageen
dc.subjectReproducibilityen
dc.subjectReliabilityen
dc.subjectInjuryen
dc.subjectScoringen
dc.titleMultimodality scoring of chondral injuries in the equine fetlock joint ex vivoen
dc.description.versionfinal draften
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Applied Physics, activitiesen
uef.solecris.id44076210en
dc.type.publicationinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.rights.accessrights© Osteoarthritis Research Society International.en
dc.relation.doi10.1016/j.joca.2016.12.007en
dc.description.reviewstatuspeerRevieweden
dc.format.pagerange790-798en
dc.relation.issn1063-4584en
dc.relation.issue5en
dc.relation.volume25en
dc.rights.accesslevelopenAccessen
dc.type.okmA1en
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionen
uef.solecris.openaccessEi


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